Instructors: Mike Compton

Welcome to Monroe-Style Mandolin

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by Mike Compton
November 18, 2015

"Howdy Folks!" Welcome to Peghead Nation's Monroe Style Mandolin track. I'm glad you've stopped by to check us out! We'll be starting from the point in time right after the Brothers Monroe parted ways and Mr. Bill went off on his own to create what's become known as the traditional bluegrass style mandolin. From there we'll go forward toward the present, so I hope you'll stick around. There will be eye-openers along the way whether you're a newbie or seasoned player and want to get some more of that old time sound. My goal is to give you the ingredients and understanding to reproduce this exciting mandolin style. I will do my best to give clear, concise direction, but if you have questions please ask and I'll do my best to iron out the wrinkles. If you commit your time and emotions to this music it will be yours!

Mike Compton

Visit the Monroe-Style Mandolin Course Page


Category: Course Discussions

Comments and Discussion

Posted by birdseed06@gmail.com on
Hello, I'm only a lesson and a half in to this. I picked up Southern Flavor, Evening Prayer Blues, and Frog on a Lilypad just from youtube, and I had to jump into lessons. I can feel my mind expanding. And beyond loving the playing, I really like Mr. Compton's teaching manner.

"How'dat feel? A little weird, huh?"

Thanks! Long live Monroe.
Posted by joanlewis53@outlook.com on
Hi Mike, just joined and I've watched the intro videos. Are there plans for technique videos...I've only been playing mandolin for a couple years and spent that time learning clean, single note melody picking but I love the sound Bill Monroe gets with his right hand. It's difficult for me to get away from the single note lines and into the more loose way he played. I can and do use double stops and such it's just that jangly or whatever it's called way of playing is hard for me...right now at least. A few technique videos would be great. I actually really liked that slidy business one you did...that's is cool indeed...! And, should I do the lessons in order or ok to jump around...I wondered if I do in order my question about the right hand might be answered but I've only been here a few days so far. Thanks!
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy everybody.
I'm heading out to San Rafael early next week to do the next round of sessions for next year's offering. Tunes/songs will cover:

Shine, Hallelujah Shine/Traveling On and On
Bluegrass Ramble (alternate tuning)
My Little GA Rose w/alternate solo
Memories of You w/alternate solo (alternate tuning)
Alabama Waltz
I'm Blue, I'm Lonesome
Uncle Pen w/alternate solo
Letter From My Darlin
Rawhide
Heavy Traffic Ahead w/alternate solo
Ben Dewberry's Final Run
Sugar Coated Love w/alternate solo

There's some really fantastic stuff in these songs, so you will want to stay around. Some of these are outtakes that I think are more interesting than the released versions that everybody is familiar with. I know you will enjoy the alternate solos and find them to be an interesting and informative option. You'll want to learn you way around these!

Wish me luck on the filming! This batch is tough!

Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Bfoss,
Thanks for your confidence in the series. I am doing my best to be accurate and informative. To answer your question...

Yes, we will get to that time period. I'm assuming you're referring to the transitional period from the '60's and on, yes? As I said to Al just now in a previous post, I am following Monroe's discography in order for the sessions and have just gotten to the beginning of the '50's. I reckon we'll be up to the material you're asking about in say 7-8 years. Of course it's understandable that we all may not want to wait that long. What specifically are you looking for?

Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Al.
No sir, you are the first to ask about "Wheel Hoss". There are quite a few versions of that tune at this point, the first being recorded in 1954. For the Peghead folks I am following the official discography on Monroe's music that was put out by Neil Rosenberg and Charles Wolfe. The next round of sessions (coming up the end of this month) will feature the first recordings from 1950. If I follow the order laid out in the discography then we will not get to "Wheel Hoss" for another couple years at least...Ha! But, if you are really hankering for it I think we can probably work something out.

Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Baron.
Glad to have you on board. John Hartford was a HUGE fan of Monroe's, both his playing and as a friend. I find myself following tangents a lot too. Sometimes it's surprising where it winds up, eh? Let me know if you need anything.

Life is good.
MC
Posted by bfoss1@sbcglobal.net on
Hi Mike,
This series continues to be wealth of information on how to play Monroe style. Plus I think it's an important document of Monroe's music. I don't believe there's a more thorough or deep analysis of his mandolin playing around!

Will you be getting into his later styles that used more sliding and seemed to have a different tonality (less bright and downstroke based and more dark and rumbly)?
Posted by astrujillo@comcast.net on
Hi Mike,

Sorry if this has been asked before - any chance you'll be teaching Wheel Hoss down the road?

Best-

Al
Posted by kindcreation@icloud.com on
Hey Mike,
I was introduced to your playing through John Hartford's music and inadvertently to this series as well. I've known for a while I should study Bill's playing and a few days ago I found an interview of him by John. That inspired me to dig a little deeper and I ended up finding your videos on youtube talking about this course. Music has a funny and beautiful way of tying things together like that.

Kind regards,
Baron
Posted by Mike Compton on
Botulizer,
Glad you got some use out of that tidbit! I think that keeping your alternating strokes in synch with the beat is really the cornerstone of making all those syncopations and rhythms work out. I can't see any other way to make it work.

Holler is you need anything else. MC
Posted by botulizer@hotmail.com on
Wow, I found the lesson on tremelo a bit harder than I expected. What you said about tremelo matching the speed of the song really caught my attention and I found actually trying to do it very challenging on something I always thought I did quite well. Thanks for that! I think maybe that was a small piece of what I was missing. Metronome time for me now!
Posted by Mike Compton on
David,
I'm really glad to hear you're getting something out of it. Breaking these tunes down and playing them phrase by phrase and then putting the puzzle back together is a quite a bit of work and not something that feels real natural for me but if it's helping folks get a deeper appreciation of Monroe's style then it's worth the effort!

Life is good. MC
Posted by davidpettorini@gmail.com on
Hey Mike- Just want to say thanks for the completely enjoyable journey this continues to be. I've been here since day one and I cant wait for each month to see what you add. It is really turning out to be a master study in Monroe and I am learning a ton using this format. Thanks for doing this - see you in September! Your friend David
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Hey!
How's it going so far? Anything you folks need extra help with?
Life is good. MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Josh,
The angle you use when 'striking' the strings is crucial to your tone and volume as you have found out. I try to play the pick flat on the strings as much as possible to maximize the return on my effort, but the wear pattern on a well-used pick usually shows a very slight tilt to one side. So it appears I favor the edge a small degree. If you use a loose grip and 'rub' or push/pull the pick back and forth you will get less percussion. Yessir, the Monroe default appears to be predominantly flat.

Let me know how you're progressing with it!
Life is good. MC
Posted by joshua.pinchhitter@gmail.com on
Hey Mike,

First of all happy new year and thanks for teaching us Monroe. It is really exciting to learn this material from you as you are certainly an amazing picker. It will be fun when you start a Compton Style mandolin class on here too!

I was hoping to ask you a technique question about where you hold the pick in relation to how it strikes the strings. I am guessing as with most things in life it depends, but as a baseline do you keep the pick flat on the strings or do you pick slightly (for example towards the bevel of a beveled pick). I find flat gives a more percussive sound which seems to be part of the Monroe styling while tilting gives more of a rounder smoother tone. Given that I would guess the Monroe default is flat? Thanks again and I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this.

-Josh
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Clyde,
That's two 'attaboys' for you this Xmas. If it makes you feel better know that I'm working on tremolo too. And left hand positions, and tone, and etc...

I had no idea Mark Royal was such a brut. But worth every penny...
Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Pat,
I haven't been putting chords on the notation because sometimes there are variations that may be applied to the chord progression. Plus, the notation gets a little overwhelming to look at the more one adds to the page. The chord changes often come on the downbeats of each quarter note in the measure so that's a good place to envision the chord changes/position shifts. Bill's style is built around playing out of chord positions or partial chords. It's not a case where he follows the notes in a given position exclusively but plays lines that connect the dots to chord tones. You can usually see the chord shapes unfolding as you play through the melody. It takes some practice, but it will become more apparent. If you really give it a go and can't come up with the answer send me a line and I'll shoot you the chord progressions.

Life is good. MC
Posted by Mandoholic@comcast.net on
Thanks Mike,

I'm really liking these lessons. In the past I've always been a cherry picker, get through the lessons fast, learn an couple of things and move on. I'm practicing more and spending time on the little things I've ignored for years. I changed my right hand at Camp last September and haven't touched the top with my little finger since then. Thanks to you for the gentle prodding and Mark Royal for yelling at me about it for 5 days. The tremolo is almost there, who knew practice actually works??? Thanks for these lessons and your encouragement.

Old but no done, Clyde
Posted by Pmurp@comcast.net on
Hi Mike,

Good to know I'm not doing a bad thing by using more wrist in my right hand.

Regarding the chords, I find it easier to locate and play the melody notes and double stops if I know what and where the chord changes are. And you have said that Monroe often plays out of chord positions so I was just curious why you don't show the changes in the notations. It's probably a good idea for me to figure them out for myself so I learn to hear them more easily.
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Bfoss,
Glad you're getting use out of the BG Breakdown lesson. There's a lot more where that came from!
Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Pat,
Thanks for your questions.
I've been noticing that I'm using more arm than I'd like. The drive is supposed to come from the wrist with pretty much an up/down motion, but I can't get much speed that way. So, there's a little bit of a turn built in that feels more natural to me. I've had to rework my right hand technique over the last couple years due to wear and tear from bad habits so I've not gotten it all worked out yet. In my opinion your arm should work like a system from your shoulder all the way down with your wrist doing the bulk of the work.

So, you caught me in my current weak spot! Rats...

I could write in the chord changes, yes, but I'm not sure how that will help you. Will you tell me how you think it will be useful?

Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Howdy Clyde.
Nothing makes all this work like practice, but you know that. Everybody has demands on their time. If you don't have time to practice 4 hours a day just pick out one area to focus on for maybe an hour, 30 minutes, 15 minutes...having a goal helps you make strides in that area.
Holler if you need anything.
Life is good. MC
Posted by bfoss1@sbcglobal.net on
Hi Mike,
I just worked through some of the variations of BG Breakdown. What a treasure trove of Monroe style licks and ideas in context! I'll be returning to that section over and over to mine more Monroe/Compton gold.
Posted by Pmurp@comcast.net on
Hi Mike,

Enjoying the lessons, struggling a bit to keep up with flow, but keep 'em coming. I do have a couple questions:

1. In watching your right hand it seems you use a straight up and down motion as opposed to the "turning the doorknob" wrist motion. More arm than wrist overall. Is that correct?

2. You've mentioned that Monroe often played out of chord positions. Would it be possible to indicate the chord changes on your notation sheets? I think it would be helpful.

Pat
Posted by Mandoholic@comcast.net on
Hi Mike,

Great, great stuff on here. While I play a lot of these tunes and songs, my interpretation is a little iffy. I like to call my style Bulldog mandolin. Very nice to clear up some of my wrong ideas. My tremolo is a problem, too much string, old, stiff hands and not enough practice. Playing along with these videos seems to be helping, kindly smooths it out a bit. I learned a lot at the '15 Camp and plan to come again when I can afford it.
Thanks, Clyde
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Hey everybody!
It was great to meet some of you at the MonManCamp'16. Glad to put some faces on you followers of Big Mon. I have just gotten together again with the folks at Peghead Nation and recorded 14 more tracks for you, four of which are live Grand Ole Opry radio transcriptions from the original classic bluegrass ensemble of Monroe/Flatt/Scruggs/Wise/Rainwater. They are made up of similar components to some of the things we've covered so far with a few new twists. The rest are Monroe material leading up to the early 1950's. I can't wait for you to hear them. Lots of work to do and some tricky shifting, but worth the effort.

I'd love to hear from you on how everthing is going so far, so give me a holler.
Life is good.
MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
You're onto it, David.
MC
Posted by David Pettorini on
Mike rest assured there is plenty to work on here for most of us! I am really enjoying seeing themes that seem to flow through most of these songs. I can see how by knowing how to navigate a whole library of these tunes one can eventually improvise by throwing in the right lick at the right time. It actually feels like learning to play in the style as well as learning the specific tunes. Can't wait for Monroe camp!
Posted by bfoss1@sbcglobal.net on
Mike, thank you for such a comprehensive answer to my question about Mr. Monroe's changing style over the years. Simply fascinating! Your "tease" about new CDs has me sitting on the edge of my seat! I am getting an awful lot from the lessons, they are great! I would like to see a right hand "clinic" as part of these lessons. I know you have lots of detailed ideas of how the right hand should be working for Monroe style music.
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Monroe fans,
I heard through the grapevine that there's something really special in the works for all us Monroe fanatics and hysterical historians. No, not a Peghead offering, but a set of CDs headed to market.

Yummmmm...
MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Just checking in to see how it's going with you guys/gals. Are you getting what you need out of the lessons? What else would you like to see happening on the site? On my page?

Speak out!
MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Bfoss,
Hmmm...quite a lot to digest in one man's style, yes? Lots of changes over the years. Some I think were due to artistic vision, some maybe catering to the technology of the times. You know, some things just sounded better and stood out more than others over on the old machines. I'm sure some of that was taken into consideration.

Bill told me once that when he and Charlie played together he played really light because there weren't but the two of them and he didn't have to play loud/hard. I don't hear the hard strokes much really until Bill got the F5 and I think with that he could hear more possibilities and had an instrument that would deliver whatever he could come up with. To me the 40's went from Bill finding a new voice other than the one he'd used with brother Charlie to having an entirely new sound/style of his own. His early 40's band to me sounded like an early western swing band sometimes and a hillbilly band at others. By the time the 40's were coming to an end he had already been in one of the most powerful and popular bands in the music business and was changing his sound even then. The early 50's to me sound very experimental and sometimes bizarre. The material the records companies had him doing was from all over the place. He had electric guitars, organs, drums, etc. Some of his mandolin work during that time was WAY outside. You can hear different mandolins on recordings during the 50's too. I think by the mid/late 50's he had the 'high lonesome sound' really working with some of the strongest musicians he ever had. Lots of downstrokes, spirited and angry-sounding tremolos, playing close to the bridge. But ever ingenious, ever creative. The 60's brought the folk revival and a revival to Bill's career as well. I think at this point that F5 Bill had was at its peak sound. And Bill came at the music like the grand master he was being presented as. He was labeled as the "Father of Bluegrass Music" at that point and he acted like it. But still outside and oh so powerful. I have recordings of his performances from this time that defy explanation on songs like "BlueGrass Twist" "On and On". Pete Rowan told me that Bill Monroe played the wildest music he's ever heard, so considering Peter's background I'd say that's saying a mouthful!

The 70's brought the modal tunes, 3 and 4 part tunes, slides...I used to have a roommate that worked for Bill around '75. He said that Bill had his other Loar on the bus and when he played it he played all that slippery material on it, but when he played his trademark F5 he did other stuff. Apparently the action on his favorite Loar was so high that he couldn't play the slides much, but when he got the neck reset on the old mandolin he went to playing the new material on it then. Seems like lots of tunes about towns and people, Bill thinking back over the years, realizing he was getting on in years. There was always the 'implied note' thing, but to me there was more of it now, doing more with less. And so it went on. Bill seemed to be on fire and playing more than ever in those days and I've heard a few ex BG Boys say that Bill was practicing more than when they were in his band. So he was all over it and creating new sounds. Not so much downstroke material anymore, but still some.

And so on to the last of him. Not a full historical perspective. There are a lot of words written on Bill's music. Some good notes in the new discography. If you don't have it check it out.
Life is good.
MC
Posted by bfoss1@sbcglobal.net on
Hi Mike. One of the things that I'm fascinated by with by these lessons is the chronology. You are illustrating well the different (to my ear) tone Mr. Monroe had in his earlier career versus his later playing. It seems to be less "slidey" and more hard edged. His later tone in the 70s and 80s seemed to be looser sounding, and (as you have said) implied more notes rather than picking every melody note. For example, the Blue Yodel has such a different approach and tone when compared to the Old Mountaineer. Am I right? Can you comment on the changes in his playing style over the decades? Thanks.
Posted by dhubbs@sals.edu on
Hi Mike -- Bluegrass Stomp would be cool, at some point. Thanks! Dan
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Hey Dan,
I happened to think about another song/tune that would give you a good picture of some of Mr. Bill's rhythm. Check out the mandolin work on "Stoney Lonesome", the original cut recorded on January 30, 1959. You'll find Bill using chop chord shapes but more or less representing the melodic rhythm with it, not just playing offbeat chops.

Life is good. MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Ha! That's an improvisation, Rick. Off the grid. You caught me. If I can figure out a way to post notation on here I will. I'll have to ask the bosses at the Peghead office if there's a way to do it.

Life is good. MC
Posted by rick@rickalbertson.net on
Hey, Mike. I am so grateful to you for providing these lessons on Peghead Nation. Absolutely great!

Is there any chance you could provide tablature/notation for the verse of True Life Blues you play from about 1:00 - 1:22 on the 1st True Life Blues Solo lesson video?

Can't wait for more lessons...

Thanks.

Rick
Posted by leppojoove@gmail.com on
Howdy there Mike,

Thank you very much for replying to my inquiry.

Yes, you have provided further insight regarding Bill's singing and rhythm style. I really appreciate your efforts to further Bill's musical legacy.

Best regards,
Dan
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Dan.
Thanks for your inquiry. All the lessons I have on PegHead have been recorded at an earlier date, so it will be quite some time before I will do another batch. It may be possible to start a list of desired topics for next time though.

One of the most significant aspects of Bill Monroe's music was gospel singing and the influence it had on his harmony style. I think that Bill learned how to sing harmony in church schools as did many people who lived in remote country towns. The clip you saw was not a rarity for Bill as he often closed his sets with at least 3-4 songs sung together and asked the crowd to join in with him. I still remember seeing waving his hands to the crowds inviting them "in". The medley approach lasted for quite some time and there was really no telling what songs might be included, although the ones you mentioned were often present. He might throw in "Blue Moon of KY" or "You've Got to Walk That Lonesome Valley" or "I'm on My Back to the Old Home" or whatever else came to mind. So, the segment was not just a selection of gospel songs. Usually Bill didn't take solos on many of the tunes either as did the fiddle and banjo.

As for the rhythm style you heard, yes, there was quite a bit more to Bill's rhythm than merely playing chop chords. He played all kinds of strums and punctuations to emphasize particular points in the songs he played. I think this aspect gets lost on most folks because it is not as up front and dramatic (although sometimes it could be) as his lead work.

Does this satisfy your curiosity regarding the topic? Let me know.
Life is good.
MC
Posted by leppojoove@gmail.com on
Howdy Mike,

I am very excited with this opportunity to learn Monroe-Style Mandolin from you! I found your Monroe-Style Mandolin Basics to be very helpful and insightful. Also, I enjoy listening to your experiences with Mr. Bill.

Recently, I was listening to a live recording from November 11, 1980 of Bill Monroe & The Bluegrass Boys at the Soft Rock Café in Vancouver, BC, Canada and was captivated by their performance of a medley of three “gospel songs”, “Swing Low Sweet Chariot/I’ll Fly Away/I Saw The Light”. Mr. Bill’s fondness for performing these songs really shines through in this performance.

Can you provide a lesson and share insight on Mr. Bills approach to perform these songs? I think this performance also demonstrates another aspect of Mr. Bill’s rhythm style that you alluded to in your lesson. It appears that he seems to approach the mandolin more like a folk guitarist on these numbers.

I look forward to your future lessons.

Thank you very much,
Dan
Posted by Kevin.e.mclaughlin@gmail.com on
Mike: The course is great and I am enjoying the chronological progression, which as you say in the course notes starts with the pre-bluegrass stylings. Makes sense since Monroe's playing evolved quite a bit over time and I would assume the base layers must be learned before moving on. I can only say that there is a lot to unpack in each of these lessons - that's a good thing, and each lesson rewards a repeated playing. I appreciate your careful attention to the exact phrasing and notes Mr. Bill used. I am hoping this gets me in shape for your camp in the fall, for which I have registered and hope to attend. I look forward to some fiddle tunes eventually. Now, if I could only get that right hand to loosen up more and learn to "rub" the strings. . . . keep 'em coming.
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Francis.
That tune is called "Tall Timber" and is not included in this round of transcriptions. Because I am presenting tunes in chronological order of recording, this one will not show up for quite some time. Maybe in a couple more years :-D...
MC
Posted by francis.tiedemann@gmail.com on
I just signed up and have not looked at all lessons yet. Just wondering if that tune played in the sample is in the lessons. I looked fast and didnt see it. If not, what is that tune? Thanks
Posted by Mike Compton on
Camp registration is underway, David. Come on...MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Greens!
Glad you approve. Stay tuned and tell your friends about Peghead Nation. I'll see you at Wintergrass. I'll be playing with Helen Highwater String Band and also will be doing a vintage instrument demonstration with Critter Saturday morning at 10:30a.
MC
Posted by 2greens.tossed@gmail.com on
Mr. Mike—
I just want to thank you for doing this. These are terrific lessons, just about the right depth to get me stretching a little, doing stuff I hadn't done much (or very well), and getting better at it. Hope to see you at Wintergrass and next September in Nashville.
Posted by davidpettorini@gmail.com on
Happy New Year everyone! My resolution is to learn all the Monroe tunes I can and take them to Mike's camp in September!
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Hey Brent,
I talked to the Peghead guys and they suggest I do a few short videos to send you regarding your question. Will iPhone or Quicktime videos work for you? Do you have specific songs you want to see demonstrated? As I understand it, you want to see chord substitutions that aren't those stretched out 'bluegrass' chop chords. Yes? Do you care for a little oldtime rhythm stylings too?
Posted by Mike_Compton on
bfoss,
I agree about the right hand. It's ultra important to get it working. So many different aspects to making it work correctly. I think it's definitely an under-studied area. So many folks want to learn licks and that's cool, but the 'meat' of the sound is in the right hand attack.

I'll make a note of your suggestion and focus some time next time we record on the right hand technique as I understand it. Thanks for your suggestion! MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Howdy JohnBoy. Glad to you're digging the Monroe track. As long as we're having fun I reckon they'll let me come back and do some more. See you in September! MC
Posted by Mike_Compton on
Bodine,
Yessir, mostly downstrokes. I know it feels unbelievably fast, but that Monroe fellow really had quite muscle reflexes. I can barely keep up with the recording. Practice this slower and focus on staying relaxed or your wrist and forearm will tighten up and then you're sunk. Try using as short a stroke as possible, conserve motion. Let me know how it goes! MC
Posted by bfoss1@sbcglobal.net on
Great lessons Mike! I once attended a one day workshop of yours and you went into detail about right hand technique. You got into some specifics about the angle of your pick hitting the strings, letting the pick flex between your fingers by holding it loosely, and rather than "picking" the strings, you suggested thinking about "rubbing" or "scrubbing" the strings. I think so much of that Monroe/Compton sound comes from the right hand, I would love to see video lessons on these topics.
Posted by johnboydwoodworks@gmail.com on
Liking the lessons here Mike,its slow enough so's my head doesent explode. I too have this on my jam list to sing.Be seeing you around, and definitely at Monroemandolincamp in Sept.Johnboy
Posted by dbodine@aquatus.com on
Hi Mike, I've been enjoying your Rocky Road Blues lesson. I've been listening to BM's recording on the '36-'59 collection. It's a pretty fast tempo. Is BM playing with all downstrokes at that tempo?
Posted by Mike_Compton on
See you there, Alec. Let me know if you need anything.MC
Posted by Alechurthurt@gmail.com on
Hey Mike, Been playing hours a day after the Monroe Mandolin Camp in September. Awesome experience everyone. Great to have a clean focused Monroe style lessons right in my own living room. See you at Wintergrass!!!!!!
Posted by Mike Compton on
Ah, I see what you're going for Brent. Let me check in with the Peghead folks and see what we can do. All the lessons in this series have been recorded/filmed already, so that's a done deal.
Posted by Brent Willis on
Mike, would you consider doing rythmn suggestions for the songs in your lessons? Nothing specifically, just interested in what you would do to back up some songs. I can't stretch for some of the Monroe chop chords so I need alternatives.
Posted by Mike Compton on
Shortfam,
Amazing that that's what got your attention. It was a quick example to illustrate a point. I don't have 'Panhandle Country' noted in that fashion. I have Monroe's solo, but it's nothing like the double stop example you are referring to. Keep an eye out for "How Will I Explain About You" on this track. It uses the same ideas regarding tremolo and slides. Keep me posted on how it goes. MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Mike, glad to be of service. Most folks (including myself) don't play 'TN Blues' like Bill wrote it. The oldtime way is the coolest IMO. MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Mel, my pleasure. Looking forward to a lot of quality time with Peghead and you all. MC
Posted by shortfam@inethome.ca on
Hey Mike. Loved the lesson on tremolo using panhandle country. Is there any chance of you giving us a tab for that song. Great song and great use of double stops for it. Looking forward to more lessons. Thanks
Posted by mikebunting@shaw.ca on
Been on this thing for 2 days now. I have played Tennessee Blues for while now but this sure open things up. Thanks.
Posted by mel@coolestone.com on
Hi Mike, Did I just die and go to Mandolin Heaven? I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw the news on Mando cafe. I've been playing for a long time but no where near where I would like to be. Haven't been playing much lately but after signing up for this course I'm as excited as the first time I picked up a mandolin. Can't wait to get started. May even get a new mandolin that I've been looking at.. this give me a great excuse!! Looking forward to learning a LOT from you. Thanks for taking your time to do this.
Posted by Mike Compton on
Howdy Brent. Sure thing. What sort of rhythm ideas are you looking for as pertains to the somgs? Life is good. MC
Posted by Mike Compton on
Hello David.
You've found the first vocal in the series! There are a number of vocals in this batch, so you wont be dissappointed. Stay in touch and let me know how it goes. MC
Posted by davidpettorini@gmail.com on
Actually just started working on Rocky Road blues- its a fun tune to sing as well as play!
Posted by Brent Willis on
Mike, would you consider doing rythmn suggestions for the songs in your lessons?
Posted by davidpettorini@gmail.com on
Hey Mike - excited to get started here! Just curious I love Monroes songwriting for the lyricism as much as the mandolin playing. Any chance there will be a lesson on a favorite vocal tune coming up?

Thanks!
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Two Courses: $30/month or $300/year
Access to All Courses: $100/month

Peghead Nation’s String School is your source for roots music instruction, bringing you full courses in guitar, mandolin, banjo, ukulele, fiddle, and Dobro, featuring talented instructors, high-quality video instruction, accurate notation and tab, and fun songs to play right from the beginning. Enroll and become a Peghead today!