Instructors: Bill Evans

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Hi everybody! Peghead Nation has lift off! Thanks for joining me for what’s going to be a fantastic musical journey.

by Bill Evans
August 26, 2014

Hi everybody! Peghead Nation has lift off! Thanks for joining me for what’s going to be a fantastic musical journey. Take some time to explore the banjo offerings and let me know what you think - I’d love to create lessons around your specific requests, whether it’s a tune, technique, lick or concept. Let's make Peghead Nation your destination for all things bluegrass banjo!


Tags: Banjo
Category: Course Discussions

Comments and Discussion

Posted by bill_evans on
To sir97048@yahoo.com who asks about a fourth string squeak when playing roll patterns: First of all, make sure that there's not a mouse inside the resonator! What kind of thumbpick are you using? Most players use a plastic thumbpick (I use a Golden Gate myself) or one of those expensive composite thumbpicks that are available from companies like Blue Chip. Some players do prefer a metal thumbpick but I've found for myself that these tend to create a lot of pick noise. If you're using a metal thumbpick, try a plastic one and see if this reduces the pick noise. And you've indeed identified the source of pick noise - it's caused by the already vibrating string "sizzling" against the pick as you move to play it again (this happens a lot in bluegrass banjo, of course!). This is something that we all have to deal with for all of our days of playing, no matter how experienced a player you are. Pick noise can be caused by a hand position that's making you work harder. Check out the Peghead lessons on how I recommend setting the right hand (to look a lot like Earl, J. D. and Bela!). Then take a look at how your fingers are moving across the strings. For the index and middle fingers, I advise using both the first and second joints. Often times, players will move these fingers almost exclusively from the second (middle) joint. However, a lot of the power in the right hand can be unleashed by bringing the first joint (the one closest to the hand) into the equation. If you're arching your wrist a bit, like most players do, you'll find this easier. It's all interrelated! I hope that some of these comments are helpful! Let me know how it's going once you've tried some of these recommendations.
Posted by bill_evans on
To Andrew Fordham, who asks about reading the tab rhythmic notation for embellishments (slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs and chokes): Thanks for this question! This is something that I cover with every one-on-one student but I've realized that I haven't talked about it in any of the Peghead lessons. You'll find a variety of ways of notating left-hand embellishments, including slides, in all of the books and tabs that have been produced over the last forty years. The placement of the embellishment is often determined by how fast you're playing. The faster the tempo, the more that the embellishment tends to be played as an eight note (in other words, the hammer-on or pull-off might be played at the same moment in which you play the next note in the roll, as in Earl Scruggs' version of "Cumberland Gap" played at performance speed. Having said this, even hammer-ons and pull-offs are often played as 16th notes even at very fast speeds but, not always! With the slide, it's my feeling that the notation isn't really capable of showing how I like to think about it. I suggest thinking of the slide in the same way as a singer might think of a vocal slide when moving up to the next melody note, as in "Will the CIR-cle be unbroken" (Lester Flatt provides a great example!). The slide moves into the next note that's played in the right-hand roll - it's neither an 8th or a 16th exactly but an embellishment which connects the two notes picked in the right hand. I also advise to get the right-hand rhythm down first and then try adding the embellishments while maintaining the correct rhythm in your picking. This usually unlocks any problems you might be experiencing combining techniques in each hand. I hope this helps! Spend some time listening at slow speeds to great banjo performances to get more of an idea of what players do with these embellishments. You can find most recordings these days on YouTube and YouTube now has a slowdown function in the Settings. Check it out!
Posted by bill_evans on
To Tony, who asks about left-hand fretting fingering choices when moving between a C major and E minor chords: Which tune is "FOTD?" Man, I'm showing my age here but I'm not sure which song you're discussing. I can address your more general topic on fretting hand finger choices however! I rarely will use barre shapes across all four strings except when vamping. You'll almost always have the choice of using either the index-middle or middle-ring fingers combination on the top two strings. It's good to get used to either way of fretting. My choice will be determined by where I'm coming from and where I'm going. When there's more than one way to do something, try both ways and see which works best for you. In my tabs that accompany each lesson, I present the left-hand fingering choices that I prefer above the tab staff. I hope this helps!
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hey everyone! I apologize for taking this long to get back to all of you with your questions. First up is J Wisener's question about whether or not there are lessons available covering scales and modes: The answer is yes! Check out both the Melodic Style and Single-String Style sections, where, you'll find lessons in playing in the keys of G, D and A under the melodic section and for playing in the keys of G major, G mixolydian and D major under the Single-String Style section. Each section also presents tunes that get you playing these scales. Jump in and enjoy!
Posted by slr97048@yahoo.com on
Thanks Bill for all the help. Minor issue: Ihave like a mouse squeek on D string when doing rolls. Could this be from using brass picks just catching the vibration of the string before striking the string? Would plastic picks solve this problem? Or am I doing something wrong mechanically?
Posted by afcor205@gmail.com on
Bill, I liked your lessons so much thaqt I gifted beginning mandolin lessons with Sharon Gilchrist to her for Christmas. Is there any chance the two of you could work something out to teach parts for the same song? We'd love to have some of these beginning tunes to play together! Thanks!

Andrew Fordham
Posted by afcor205@gmail.com on
Hi, Bill! I'm a lifelong professional musician (french horn) who recently decided it would be fun to pick up banjo, and your great lessons are helping me along the way!

Here's my question: in the Cripple Creek lessons where you teach slides, the first time you introduce slides for the B section, you are very clearly playing them as 16th notes with two distinct pitches. However, thereafter, the two pitches are not there, even though I can see you doing a slide. In other words, even though the tabs have it marked as 2 16ths and an 8th note, you're just playing it as 2 8th notes. Can you offer some clarity here? Now that I've moved on to the hammer on lesson for Cripple Creek, those honestly sound similar to the way you first taught the slide, and now I'm super confused! Thanks for any help you can offer!

Andrew Fordham
Posted by tbuffa@sonic.net on
Hi Bill & Scott,

Happy New Year. Will we see either of you at Wintergrass 2018?

Tony
Posted by ksikkeng@umich.edu on
Hi Bill - How about Mining Camp Blues? I've only ever heard Foghorn String Band cover it but it's a great tune. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roDzuen_9rM
Posted by tbuffa@sonic.net on
Hi Bill, I have a question on the alternate chord fingering for the second line of the verse on FOTD. There is a C chord at the 5th fret, it looks like it could be barred, followed by an Em at the 5th fret. So, would it be better to use index-middle-ring rather than bar the C and move the index finger back to the 3rd string 4th fret for the Em that follows? Thanks for the lessons! Tony
Posted by jwisener@gmail.com on
Hi Bill, do you have any lessons that cover scales and modes?
Posted by chrisarns@gmail.com on
Hi Bill, sounds good, thank you!
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hey there Raggmopp! Having the picks make noises on the head is a common problem. Are you having trouble with the thumb pick or the fingerpicks? In either case, try arching your wrist a bit more to raise the fingers above the banjo head (just a bit - don't take this too far!), until your angle of approach is such that you're not hitting the banjo head with your fingerpicks. You want your wrist bent and your shoulder and elbow relaxed into the banjo. This will allow you to play in a way that your thumb is mostly sweeping across to play a string (rather than moving down to hit the string, hitting the string and then moving up to avoid the adjacent string). Once your wrist is arched a bit, you should then be able to hit the strings with the index and middle fingers by moving from both the first and second joints of the fingers (the joints closest to the hand). Don't forget to bring that first joint (the one connecting the fingers to the palm/hand) into the action as this gives you more power and is a simpler, easier motion. Good luck!
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hey there Chris,

I think it's important to learn well each thing that you're working on before moving on to the next skill or challenge. In my experience, building up speed is what can take weeks, months or years, depending upon how much time you're putting into practicing. I tell my private students here in California that if you're starting from scratch, it can take from 2 1/2 to 4 years to feel comfortable in a jam session - knowing what to play and having a few songs that you can lead everyone through. If you're playing tunes well at medium speeds, I think it's fine to move on to the next tune or skill. A metronome can be very handy to work on building up speed as it allows you to gradually increase speed. If you can send an email to me at bill@billevansbanjo.com, I'd be happy to send you a sheet with tips on effectively working up speed (and this invitation is open to anyone, not just Chris!). Getting your eyes off of the tab is a big part of working up speed too, by the way.
Posted by raggmopp@mosquitonet.com on
Hello Bill. I love the banjo lessons. Does anybody have a way I can keep my picks from making scratching noises on the head? I know what you are going to say but I can't seem to stop it by changing everything I can think of. Maybe it's an echo? I use all plastic picks. It's slowing me up on playing, trying to stop it.
Posted by chrisarns@gmail.com on
Hi Bill, I'm really enjoying the lessons! I'm up to Old Joe Clark, learning the middle leading roll. A quick question: how long should I spend on learning each lesson/song? I feel like I could spend weeks and weeks to truly master each song and play it up to speed, but am worried about getting bogged down and not advancing fast enough. Any thoughts? Thank you!!
Posted by bradfieldjohng@gmail.com on
Thank you for Lucy. I have been wanting a tab of that ever since I heard it on your record. Who knew it was a banjo song - it even has an honest-to-goodness banjo roll in the chorus! Well, kinda. Dare I suggest you give us 'You've got to hide your love away' and 'hard day's night? See you at Swannanoa. John Bradfield
Posted by ptombarrett@sbcglobal.net on
Bill, what about "the rest of the story"? When I was a beginning flat picker I was taught the melodies but not the back-ups so all I knew was the melody and when I started to jam with folks I was lost because I couldn't just keep playing the melody (I tried but got goofy looks from everyone) then I realized that 90% of the time in a jam you are playing back-up and only 10% (depends on the size of the group) of the time the melody. Now trying to learn banjo I think it would help having tips on the back-up portion to go along with the melody. Do you just play the melody quieter behind the other musicians and then go loud when it is your turn or do you go for the cording and pinch or roll the cords? Thanks Tom
Posted by goldstromb@yahoo.com on
Hi, Bill. I am very much enjoying these lessons along with a number of your books and DVD's. They are all terrific. Your explanations and learning progressions are always top notch. One additional feature you might consider adding to this site at some point would be MP3's of you playing through the various tabs. After watching a video lesson, I seem to learn best by putting some related MP3's into the Amazing Slowdowner software, as I do with your book, Bluegrass Banjo for Dummies, so that I can repeat and practice various measures and subsections at differing speeds. If that could ever be added to these lessons, it would be a really helpful extra feature. However, even without that, these video lessons are outstanding. Thanks. Bruce
Posted by bill_evans on
Hi Karen and thanks for getting in touch! Your banjo should have a standard spacing and neck profile so let's take a look at what your fretting hand is doing. Make sure that you're not "palming" the neck - the palm of your hand should not be touching the back of the neck. Are you practicing while wearing a well-fitting strap? Be sure that you're not supporting the weight of the banjo neck with your fretting hand as this will effectively shorten the length of your fretting fingers. I recommend as a point of contact the pad of the fretting hand thumb, resting on the upper hemisphere of the back of the banjo neck. Relax your shoulder *and* your elbow. This usually moves the entire fretting hand forward, effectively lengthening your fingers. Check out the "Easy Chords and Chording" lesson under "Banjo Basics" for a video demonstration of effective fretting hand position and fretting techniques. Then, get back to me to let me know how it's going! Thanks! Bill
Posted by ksikkeng@umich.edu on
I have a deeming goodtime which seems to have a fairly wide neck and I have small hands. I can't play th F shape chord no matter how slowly I place my fingers. My ring finger and index finger always tamp down the middle strings. Any tips? Karen
Posted by poneleit-nina@gmx.de on
Hi Bill,

finally signed up for your Bluegrass Banjo course and am very happy with it. I am currently working on Big Sciota. I love that tune. There is one part of the tune I always get stuck. And that is the part where the role pattern is turning from forward to backward roll. Do you have any ideas how to practice that, maybe in combination with scale workouts?
Love your teaching method very much!
Many greetings from Heidelberg, Germany (and from Alex, too!)
Nina
Posted by judeca2001@yahoo.com on
Hi Bill,

Yesterday I heard Loretta Lynn's song Blue Kentucky Girl and noticed it was all banjo background to her singing. This would be a nice slower song to learn to play. Still having fun playing.

Judy
Posted by chrisarns@gmail.com on
Bill, thank you for the great (and speedy) response! I'll start using the metronome and will check out the backup tracks. That's definitely very helpful! Thanks again! I'm really enjoying this course.

Happy holidays,
Christopher
Posted by bill_evans on
That's a great question, Christopher as everyone has to figure this one out! A great way to gradually work up speed is to start playing with a metronome. Getting started can be the most challenging aspect of this. Most banjo players will get started by letting one click on the metronome equal two roll notes, or a quarter note (like you use with a pinch pattern). Set the metronome number at a low enough speed where you can comfortably play along. I use a metronome app on my desktop computer so that I can get adequate volume through my computer's speakers.

I wouldn't start using a metronome to increase speed on a song until you can already play the song smoothly, at a slow speed, without interruption. However, most all of us can hit the ground running now with the metronome by using it in warm ups with roll patterns.

Another option is to seek out the play along tracks on the Peghead Nation website, where guitarist Scott Nygaard provides rhythmic accompaniment. Several individuals are now also offering online backing tracks at various speeds. Google "bluegrass backing tracks" and see what comes up.

I hope these recommendations help! Remember to practice at a speed where it's sounding good and as you try to increase tempo, work on those specific small parts of the tune that are giving you trouble.

All the best,

Bill Evans
Posted by chrisarns@gmail.com on
Hi Bill,

Love your teaching style and the course is very easy to follow. I just got finished learning the module on "Cripple Creek" and am wondering how I can learn to play that song (and I guess, any song) a bit faster. Your "up to tempo" version at the end of the fourth video is great; does playing like that just take time or is there anything I can do to learn to play faster?

Best,
Christopher Arns
Posted by bradfieldjohng@gmail.com on
Bill - Never mind suggestion about an intros/endings class. Saw the class when I went back and scanned through the list again; missed it the first time. I'll look for the one you use on Turkey but if it is not there, it would be a nice tab to add.
John
Posted by bradfieldjohng@gmail.com on
Bill,
These lessons are fun. Is your ending lick on Turkey in the Straw play along on a tab you have handed out in a class? I could not find it. If not it would be nice here. Ever consider doing an intro lick/ending lick class? There are a lot scattered through these lessons but it might be interesting to see what a bunch of them all together with examples of how to use them.
Posted by judeca2001@yahoo.com on
Hi Bill,
I am enjoying the lessons! I like your cheery encouraging style! Thinking of a song I would like to learn. I'll come up with one. :)
Thanks so much.
Judy
Posted by mike.m.moffitt@gmail.com on
Hello Bill,

I finally got signed up. It was a genuine honor to meet you the past couple of years at the Midwest Banjo Camp. My very best to you and your family. I really hope our paths cross again.

All the best,
Mike Moffitt
Posted by Dennis Clark on
I am 70 years old and love banjo music. I am on the fast track to learn the banjo and your lessons are great! Please keep up the great work!

Dennis Clark
Posted by bill_evans on
Hi Roger,

It was great seeing you at Camp Bluegrass this year and thanks for this great question. I'd begin on the Bluegrass Track by making sure you're familiar with the material presented in the roll patterns and the Essential Earl down-the-neck licks sections. You could then try and tackle Earl's version of "Fireball Mail," which puts many basic techniques to good use and then move on to "Dixie Breakdown" for a bit of up-the-neck passing chord work. The forward-roll backup lessons are also going to be really useful for playing in jam sessions.

Try this sequence and let me know how it's going - and thanks for being a part of the PN banjo community!

Sincerely,

Bill Evans
Posted by Roger Vertrees on
Hi Bill,

Just spent the week with you at Camp Bluegrass and am very interested in this course. What is your recommendation about how to get started in the course, are there different levels? really enjoyed your playing at the camp, what a great experience for me.

Thanks
Roger
Posted by tw_harvey@icloud.com on
Happy New Year Bill,
Thanks for providing these banjo lessons. I have learned a lot in a short amount of time due to your attention to detail by going over each tune note by note and measure by measure. I've been playing mandolin over 15 years and have made the 5 string banjo my new brain game. It's helps that I know most of the songs you teach so I have them in my DNA, now it's getting the finger rolls to brain communication wired in.
I am so happy to have found your teaching style so accessible and can put it to application in our jam group "The Cedar Street Boys" here in Auburn, CA.
We have been looking for a banjo sound for sometime, so I figured what the hell just do it. It adds a whole new element to our sound, now I just have to manage my practice time so I don't lose my mandolin skills along the way.
Thank You and keep the lessons coming. Do you ever play around the Auburn/Grass Valley/Nevada city area?
Posted by rcreech747@aol.com on
Bill,
I continue to enjoy these lessons and as a native from NC of course you can never go wrong with Earl Scruggs. I hope everything is going great for you and your family. See you at banjo camp!! I really love when you are showing how to find the melodies for I am definitely ear challenged:)
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Rashunda,

Thanks for practicing using a strap! It makes sense to do this whether you're sitting or standing as it helps to balance the instrument. You don't want to be using your fretting hand to also be supporting the weight of the neck.

You might want to try adjusting the strap upwards a bit (in other words, make it shorter). This might position the banjo so that it's naturally tilting upwards just enough for you to see the chords. This comes easy for those of us with "Dunlop's Disease," like me (what's Dunlop's Disease you ask? That's where your belly done laps over your belt!!).

But...seriously! My advice is not to tilt the banjo too much to see the fretboard. Many players actually play by not looking at the fretboard in this way but they keep track of where they are on the banjo neck using the position dots that are on the top of the neck. For those first down the neck chords you learn, this isn't needed, of course.

Try getting used to the feel of each chord and the movement of fingers and it's always fine to look at your fretting hand while you're playing, but don't tilt too much. With practice, your fingers will automatically go to where they need to go without you having to look directly down upon the fretboard.

Keep practicing and it'll happen!
Posted by rashunda@gmail.com on
Can I rant and whine just a tad? I'm still stuck on "Easy chords and chording." They're not easy.:-) I'm playing the banjo with the strap, but I have to keep turning the banjo slightly upwards to see where I'm placing my fingers on the fret board. I guess being able to do it by touch will come...one day...right?
Posted by rashunda@gmail.com on
Hi all. I've had a Deering Good Time banjo sitting around for about six years now and have finally decided to learn how to play it. Really glad to have discovered this site and Bill's lessons!
Posted by banjoz8@charter.net on
Hello Bill - I enjoyed your workshop and concert with Alan Munde here in Kennewich, WA. I bought your "Bill Evans PLays Banjo" album and enjoy it a lot. One tune is sticking in my head theses days: "New Black Eyed Susie" I was wondering if tab is available? Also it would make a nice addition to the bluegrass instructions on the site.

In the meantime I am working on "Foggy Mountain Special" Thanks.
Jim Zimmerschied
Posted by Scottnyg on
Ken, I use Finale for all the notation and tab on Peghead Nation. I think Bill uses Sibelius for his own personal tab.
Scott Nygaard
Editor and Co-Founder
Peghead Nation
Posted by Kjewell21@optonline.net on
Hey Bill, Just out of interest sake what is the Tab Program you guys are using? Thanks!..Ken
Posted by banjobll@pacbell.net on
Hi Bill - when I first signed on to Peghead Nation lessons with you (a lot easier than driving 90 miles to see you!), I made nit-pickin' complaints about the appearance of your banjo tablatures. I just downloaded the tabs for your up-the-neck lessons. They are now beautiful! nice job, and thanks!

Bill Avellino
Posted by tim@thurgoland.net on
Hi Bill,

I know it's a cliché but a lesson on Duelling Banjos would be great (with a play-along with Scott N). Particularly how to break-down the second part into manageable learning chunks.

Tim
Posted by Lmasters1980@gmail.com on
Bill,
I like how you teach us to learn the melody and then add rolls to it. I have been looking for this kind of instruction for a long time. Do you think that it is possible you could teach us country roads by John Denver in the future? Also , can you have a discussion on how to have a very productive and structured practice time. Thank you so much !

Luke Masters
Posted by comlink8@gmail.com on
Bill,
Thanks for your cheerful enthusiasm! It does pump up us students and gives us a little more confidence tacking things. Really appreciate you sharing your knowledge!
Posted by davekochis@gmail.com on
Bill, Please put on your "to do list", Foggy Mountain Special.

thanks

Dave
Posted by bubbacollins@comcast.net on
Bill,
I look forward to a lesson that discusses how to create long flowing melodic-style licks. In the meantime, when you're playing a tune in the Key of G and the tune changes to a C major chord, can you continue to play in or around the melody using notes in the G major scale or should you switch to notes in the C major scale?

Thanks,
Bob
Posted by davekochis@gmail.com on
Hi Bill: Re Deep Elem Blues, the key of C. 9lyAe9

Thanks

Dave
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Dave,

What key for Deep Elem Blues? :)

All the best,

Bill
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Bob,

Yes, you are right on track. First off, you can improvise using the melodic style but sooner or later, I know that I would want to head back to something that's roll-based, if for no other reason that to catch my breath. At some point, I'll definitely create a lesson that discusses how to create long flowing melodic-style licks. For now, here's a huge hint - in the key of G, when you head to a C chord, try to include an F instead of an F# in whatever you're playing. Then when the progression heads to a D or D7, go back to the F#. This will work for most major key bluegrass songs (but not for bluesy oriented things!). Try this and see if it works! All the best, Bill
Posted by bubbacollins@comcast.net on
I really don't have any particular song in mind that I'm interested in working up with the melodic style. I guess from your response, that it isn't likely that one would try improvising using exclusively the melodic style. I think I'll continue improvising using the Scruggs style and try to work up some melodic licks to stick in here and there. If you're familiar with G major scale and some melodic licks, it seems that you can't always use those licks when a song that's in the Key of G when a C maj or D maj chords comes into play. Sometimes it sound OK and sometimes not. Am I wrong?
Bob C.
Posted by davekochis@gmail.com on
Hi Bill: would you please give us a lesson for Deep Elem Blues in the Blue Grass Banjo track.

Thanks
Dave
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Bob,

Thanks for your question! Are you checking out the beginning banjo or the bluegrass banjo lesson track? There are two lessons already up on the bluegrass track that show you how to play the G major scale and teach "Devil's Dream," which is one of the first tunes that bluegrass banjo players often attempt in melodic style (thanks to Bill Keith, who recorded it with Bill Monroe back in the 1960's).

Once you have the mechanics of the scale down, you have to have the melody in your head. If you're not working from someone else's arrangement via tab, it can be a painstaking process.

For bluegrass vocal tunes, melodic style isn't needed very often to capture the song's melody as these melodies don't move fast enough - Scruggs style tends to be just fine. But there are melodic licks that you can insert in any song if you're improvising. Melodic is great for fiddle tunes and even Bach, if you're adventurous.

Is there a specific song you're interested in working up, Bob?
Posted by bubbacollins@comcast.net on
Bill,
You're explanation regarding finding a melody first then adding rolls that fit was reassuring to me, I've been using that approach for some time. How do you approach working a tune up in a melodic style? A lesson on this subject would be truly helpful to me.

Bob C.
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Tommy,

I don't do any kind of pre-playing stretching but I do begin practice sessions by making sure I'm using the best hand technique possible (maintaining good hand positions, etc.) and I start off by playing things slowly, with a metronome. And I try to be relaxed. I put the emphasis on playing with good tone and staying in rhythm. When things then start to flow and I'm feeling more warmed up, I'll increase the tempo.

I hope this helps!

All the best,

Bill Evans
Posted by Bill Evans on
Hi Dave,

We've just gone live with a lesson on finding the melody notes and adding roll patterns to "Blue Ridge Cabin Home," so be sure to check that lesson out when you get the chance. Ear-training is a lifelong process. After you learn the scales and modes you need (in the keys that you're wanting to play tunes), the best practice is to *just do it*. Hunt the notes out and don't be afraid to learn from "mistakes." Try finding the melody (without rolls or any specific bluegrass techniques) to songs you know - whether it be something like "Happy Birthday" or a bluegrass standard or a Christmas song. You're stretching your brain-ear-finger connection in this way. Then after you find the melody, you can think about how to add rolls and licks to make it sound like great bluegrass banjo. We all want to improvise well on the fly and I still have a lot of work to do in this department after playing for over forty years. Just keep at it!

All the best,

Bill
Posted by davekochis@gmail.com on
Bill, I an not very good at finding melody notes quickly and that hinders my ability to improvise on the fly. Do you have any specific practice exercises you could recommend to improve my ability to quickly pick up on melody notes?
Posted by Tommy Judson on
Anyone have a good pre-playing finger/hand warm up/flexabiliting/strengthening exercise they would like to pass along?
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