BEGINNING/INTERMEDIATE FIDDLE

with Chad Manning

Sponsored By

About This Course

Learn basic fiddle techniques by learning popular traditional tunes, with lots of technique tips and advice on how to get that fiddley sound.

CHAD MANNING

Chad Manning is a Bay Area bluegrass, old-time, and swing fiddler who currently plays with the David Grisman Sextet, the David Grisman Bluegrass Experience, and Laurie Lewis and the Right Hands.

ChadManningFiddle.jpg

Over the years he has toured with many bluegrass greats such as J.D. Crowe, Curly Seckler, Alan Munde, and Tony Trischka, to name a few. Chad also finds great joy in teaching and working with all levels of adult fiddle students. He and his wife, Catherine, teach more than a hundred students at their studio in Berkeley, California.

chadmanning.com

 

Beginning/Intermediate Fiddle Course Overview

Latest Beginning/Intermediate Fiddle Lessons

Bow Tilt, Patterns, and More

Chad answers some student’s questions about tilting the bow, recovering your bow pattern, and more. 

Chords in the Key of C

Learn to combine the major chords in the key of C (C, F, and G) in different ways using double stops on different string sets. With Notation 

Feedback and Discussion

Let Chad know what you think of the course and interact with fellow Peghead Nation fiddle students.

Peghead Play-Along Tracks

Peghead Nation is creating a library of accompaniment videos (and downloadable MP3s) for songs and tunes that are taught on the site, classics that you'll find at many jams and picking parties. As a subscriber, you have access to this library and can use the tracks to practice playing tunes and songs at a slow or medium tempo with guitar accompaniment. New songs will be added regularly. 

Beginning/Intermediate Fiddle Lessons

Subscribe to the Beginning/Intermediate Fiddle course today for access to all of these fiddle lessons and new material every month! All fiddle tune lessons include notation.

FIDDLE TECHNIQUE

  • Care and Maintenance of Your Fiddle Learn key tips for taking good care of your fiddle and bow, such as loosening the bow before you put it away, cleaning your strings, how much rosin to use, and more. 
  • Tuning the Fiddle Chad defines Equal Tempered tuning and shows how to get in tune using an electronic tuner.
    Bow Technique
  • Bow Technique, Part 1: Getting Comfortable with the Bow Bow technique is all about trying to get the tone you hear in your head out of your fiddle. Chad demonstrates his approach to holding the bow.
  • Bow Technique, Part 2: Bow Tones Play along with Chad and imitate the sound he’s getting on this simple call-and-response exercise exploring different bow tones, from a percussive edge to smoother sounds.
  • Bow Technique, Part 3: Coordinating Your Hands Learn to coordinate your hands better by planting your finger just before the bow stroke. Includes bow exercises using a simple D major scale.
    Left-Hand Technique
  • Left-Hand Technique, Part 1: Finger and Hand Positions Learn how best to position your left-hand on the fiddle. Chad talks about the difference between playing with the tips of the fingers versus the pads, and how much pressure to use to get the best tone.
  • Left-Hand Technique, Part 2: Finding Pitch Chad delves into various pitch issues, such as the nice “ring” you can get when you play certain notes perfectly in tune, landing notes firmly with your fingers and adjusting the pitch afterward by “rolling” your finger, and more.
  • Left-Hand Technique, Part 3: Playing with a Drone Playing with a drone is a great way to work on your intonation and really find out whether you’re playing in tune or not. 
    Vibrato
  • Vibrato Learn some exercises for developing your vibrato. Chad starts by explaining that vibrato should not be just a shake of your finger but very deliberate changes in pitch. Chad gives you some great vibrato exercises to try, starting with slowly rolling your finger flat and then back to pitch. You’ll practice this by repeating it in cycles. 
FIRST FIDDLE TUNES
 
    Angeline the Baker
  • Angeline the Baker, Part 1: Learning the Melody “Angeline the Baker” is one of the most popular fiddle tunes at bluegrass and old-time jams throughout the world. Chad teaches the melody phrase by phrase.
  • Angeline the Baker, Part 2: Adding Layers (A Part) Add the fiddle “layers” to “Angeline the Baker” that really make you sound like a fiddler, including hammer-ons, up-sweeps, anticipation, and double-stringing.
  • Angeline the Baker, Part 3: Adding Layers (B Part) Add the fiddle layers to the B part of “Angeline the Baker.” Chad talks about sliding into notes and ends with an improvised version of the tune.
  • Angeline the Baker Play-Along Track Use this video to play “Angeline the Baker” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.
    June Apple
  • June Apple, Part 1: The A Part and the “Nashville Shuffle”Sample Lesson Learn the popular old-time tune “June Apple.” Chad teaches the A part phrase by phrase and shows you the “Nashville shuffle” bowing pattern.
  • June Apple, Part 2: The B Part and the “Georgia Shuffle” Learn the B part of “June Apple” phrase by phrase, as well as the “Georgia shuffle” bowing pattern. 
  • June Apple, Part 3: Medium Tempo Practice Track Use this video to practice playing the entire tune at a medium tempo with Chad and guitar accompaniment.
  • Improvising on “June Apple,” Part 1: Chords and Backup If you want to improvise on “June Apple,” the first step is to learn the chords. Chad shows you the chord progression as well as a nice backup rhythm. 
  • Improvising on “June Apple,” Part 2: Improvisational Approaches Chad talks about his philosophy of improvising and shows you how he distills a tune down to its most basic elements, so that you can start playing around with the rhythm, varying the melody, etc. 
  • Improvising on “June Apple,” Part 3: Play-Along Track Use this video to practice improvising on “June Apple” at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment.
    Elk River Blues
  • Elk River Blues Learn “Elk River Blues,” a simple yet evocative old-time tune from West Virginia fiddler Ernie Carpenter. Chad plays it through phrase by phrase.
  • Elk River Blues Play-Along Track Chad shows you the chords to “Elk River Blues” and points out the tune’s “crooked” phrasing, in which some phrases have an extra measure of 2/4. Play along with Chad as he plays the tune at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment.
    Old Joe Clark
  • Old Joe Clark, Part 1 “Old Joe Clark” is one of the most well-known American fiddle tunes. It’s in the key of A Mixolydian, which means that the seventh step of the A major scale (G#) is lowered to a G natural.
  • Old Joe Clark, Part 2: Adding Layers Once you’ve learned the basic melody of “Old Joe Clark,” it’s time to add the fiddle “layers” that really make you sound like a fiddler.
  • Old Joe Clark, Part 3: Variations If you’ve learned the melody to “Old Joe Clark” you can learn a more “notey” version of the melody, with variations to each phrase. 
  • Old Joe Clark Play-Along Track Use this video to play “Old Joe Clark” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.
    Whiskey Before Breakfast
  • Whiskey Before Breakfast, Part 1: The A Part Another need-to-know fiddle is “Whiskey Before Breakfast.” Chad teaches this favorite phrase by phrase, giving you lots of time to play along with him. 
  • Whiskey Before Breakfast, Part 2: The B Part  Chad walks you through the B part phrase by phrase and shows you some cool slides you can use.
  • Whiskey Before Breakfast, Part 3: Variations Once you’ve learned the A and B parts to “Whiskey Before Breakfast,” you can try a few of the melodic variations that Chad shows you in this video.
  • Whiskey Before Breakfast Play-Along Video Use this video to play “Whiskey Before Breakfast” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.
    Tennessee Waltz
  • Tennessee Waltz “Tennessee Waltz” is a beautiful and popular waltz played all over North America. It’s in the key of D and Chad gets you started with a D scale and a D arpeggio before walking you through the melody phrase by phrase. 
  • “Tennessee Waltz” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Tennessee Waltz” at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment.
    St. Anne’s Reel 
  • St. Anne’s Reel, Part 1 “St. Anne’s Reel” is a Canadian fiddle tune that has become popular wherever fiddlers are gathered. Chad walks you through the A part, playing each phrase slowly so you can play along. 
  • St. Anne’s Reel, Part 2 Chad shows you each phrase of the B part slowly, pointing out where the melody outlines a D chord, and giving you plenty of opportunities to play along with him. 
  • St. Anne’s Reel, Part 3: Chords If you’re going to play along with another fiddler, or another instrumentalist who wants to take a solo, it’s good to know the the chords you can use to accompany them. Chad shows you chord voicings for D, G, A, B minor, and E minor and a “train shuffle” rhythm you can use. 
    Pretty Little Dog
  • Pretty Little Dog “Pretty Little Dog” is a pretty little A modal tune that comes from West Virginia fiddler Lee Triplett, and is now played by Celtic fiddlers, old-time fiddlers, and others. Chad shows it to you slowly, phrase by phrase, giving you a chance to play the tune along with him as you learn it and then shows you how to add some fiddle “layers” like double stringing, slides, and hammer-ons. 
    Seneca Square Dance
  • Seneca Square Dance, Part 1 Learn the old-time tune “Seneca Square Dance,” which Chad learned from a 1920s recording of fiddler Sam Long. He plays the tune through and then breaks it down, phrase by phrase, paying particular attention to the bowing, which combines long held notes with quick bow strokes. You’ll learn the A part to “Seneca Square Dance” in this video. 
  • Seneca Square Dance, Part 2 Learn the B part of “Seneca Square Dance” in this video. Chad, again, pays special attention to the bowing, which has only two slurs in the B part. He ends by playing “Seneca Square Dance” at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment, so you can play along with him. 
  • Seneca Square Dance” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Seneca Square Dance” at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment.

SCALES AND CHORDS

    Scales and Chords

  • Scales and Chords, Part 1: Major Scales In this basic music theory lesson, Chad shows you how scales and chords are constructed so you can find them in any key. 
  • Scales and Chords, Part 2: Chords Learn how major chords (also called triads) are constructed. Chad shows you how to construct a major chord using the root, third, and fifth notes of the major scale, and shows you various major chords, as well as the “shapes” you can use to remember them.
    Major Scales in Bluegrass Keys
  • Major Scales in Bluegrass Keys, Part 1 In this lesson, you’ll learn some major scale exercises in all the bluegrass keys. Chad starts by reviewing how a major scale is constructed and playing through a G major scale. He also shows you a trick for remembering how many sharps are in the keys of G, D, A, and E. 
  • Major Scales in Bluegrass Keys, Part 2 Learn an exercise in which you play the major scale modes with long bow strokes: a down bow for the ascending octave and an up bow for the descending octave. Then you’ll learn major scales for the bluegrass keys: A, Bb, B, C, D, E, and F. 
 BLUEGRASS SONGS AND TUNES
 
    Bury Me Beneath the Willow
  • “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” with Double Stops Put what you learned in the lessons on Scales and Chords to use in this lesson by adding double stops to the melody of the old-time and bluegrass favorite “Bury Me Beneath the Willow.”
  • “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” Play-Along Track Use this video to play “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.
    Bluegrass Stomp
  • Bluegrass Stomp The Bill Monroe instrumental “Bluegrass Stomp,” a swingy blues in the key of D, gives you the opportunity to work on some new bow techniques, in particular, learning to stop the bow, or “bow breaks.” Chad shows you the melody phrase by phrase, including a bowing in which you play two up bows in a row. 
    Kentucky Waltz
  • Kentucky Waltz, Part 1: Melody Bill Monroe’s “Kentucky Waltz” was one of his most popular recordings. It’s in the key of D, so Chad gets you started by reviewing the D major and pentatonic scales. Then he walks you through the basic melody, phrase by phrase. He also talks about how the notes of the melody relate to the chords that go with the tune, because some of the phrases outline the chords. 
  • Kentucky Waltz, Part 2: Double Stops In this lesson you’ll learn to add double stops (harmony notes) to the melody of “Kentucky Waltz.” Chad also gives advice on fingering double stops so you can get two clear notes. 
  • “Kentucky Waltz” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Kentucky Waltz” at a medium tempo with guitar accompaniment. 
    Your Love Is Like a Flower
  • Your Love Is Like a Flower, Part 1 Chad shows you his approach to playing bluegrass solos using this bluegrass standard. You’ll learn the melody and chords in the key of E, which is the key Chad sings it in, using standard “capo” positions, the major pentatonic scale, and other bluegrass fiddle techniques. 
  • Your Love Is Like a Flower, Part 2 Chad gives you exercises to help you learn to match the melody of “Your Love Is Like a Flower” with the chords, and shows how you can move the “capo” position to different keys, like B, Bb, etc. 
  • “Your Love Is Like a Flower” Play-Along Track: Key of E Use this video to practice playing “Your Love Is Like a Flower” in the key of E at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.
  • “Your Love Is Like a Flower” Play-Along Track: Key of A 
  • “Your Love Is Like a Flower” Play-Along Track: Key of G 
  • “Your Love Is Like a Flower” Play-Along Track: Key of D 
  • “Your Love Is Like a Flower” Play-Along Track: Key of C 

    Clinch Mountain Backstep

  • Clinch Mountain Backstep, Part 1 The great bluegrass singer and banjo player Ralph Stanley recently passed away at the age of 89. His bluegrass banjo tune “Clinch Mountain Backstep” has become a bluegrass standard that players of every instrument should know. It’s in A Mixolydian and has an extra beat in the second half. Chad starts by playing through the A Mixolydian scale and then takes “Clinch Mountain Backstep” apart phrase by phrase. He also shows you how to anticipate or “jump” the beat as well as some bluesy slides and double stops.
  • Clinch Mountain Backstep, Part 2: Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Clinch Mountain Backstep” at a medium tempo with Chad and guitarist Scott Nygaard.
IMPROVISATION
  • Improvising on a Blues: “Bluegrass Stomp,” Part 1 Learn how to improvise on a blues tune like “Bluegrass Stomp.” Chad starts by showing you the D major pentatonic scale, and shows you how you can flat the third of that scale to play over the G chord, as well as a simple chord position to play on the A chord. That gives you a starting point for each of the chords in the tune. 
  • Improvising on a Blues: “Bluegrass Stomp,” Part 2 Learn the pentatonic scale and its variations on the E and A strings, with some similar licks in a new position. Chad also shows you how to play seventh chords to back up a blues tune, and talks about learning to sing along with your playing. 
  • “Bluegrass Stomp” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice improvising on “Bluegrass Stomp” with guitar accompaniment.
  • Improvising in B Modal In this lesson, Chad shows you a great way to improvise or play solos on bluesy bluegrass songs in the key of B. He starts by showing you the B minor pentatonic scale, which has the same notes as the D major pentatonic scale, and then shows you how by just changing the D natural note to D# you get a great blues scale in the key of B major.  
CHORD INTENSIVES
  • Chord Intensive, Part 1: D Chord In this in-depth lesson on chords, you’ll learn a couple of double stops on each string for G and D chords, some exercises to help you practice them, and some ways to work on transitioning between the chords. Chad also gives you advice on hand position and rotating your fingers to get clean double stops, and shows you the D double stops on all three sets of strings. With Double Stop Chart and Practice Track
  • Chord Intensive, Part 2: G Chord In this video, you’ll learn G chord double stops, with some exercises on practicing them just like you did with the D chord. With Double Stop Chart and Practice Track
  • Chord Intensive, Part 3: Connecting D and G Chords After you learn the D and G chord double stops you’ll learn to move from D to G and vice versa.  With Double Stop Chart and Practice Track
  • Chord Intensive, Part 4: C and F Chords In this lesson, you’ll continue your work on chords by learning all the double stops for the C and F chords in first position. Chad shows you each double stop in C and then gives you a short exercise to play using the double stops. He also shows you a couple of sliding double stops that move up into third position. Once you’ve learned the C double stops, Chad moves on to the key of F, showing you the notes in the F chord and then the double stops you get by combining them. He also gives you an exercise to practice all your F double stops just like you did with the C double stops. 
  • Chords in the Key of C Learn to combine the major chords in the key of C (C, F, and G) in different ways using double stops on different string sets. Chad starts by showing you how to move the basic C double stop shape on the middle two strings over to the bottom two strings to get an F chord, and move it to the top two strings to get a G. Then he shows you some different options for playing double stops on each string set on what he calls “Bluegrass Chord Progression Number 1,” the progression for songs like “Bury Me Beneath the Willow,” “Your Love Is Like a Flower,” and more.  
 MORE FIDDLE TUNES

    Blackberry Blossom

  • Blackberry Blossom, Part 1 Learn the old-time and bluegrass fiddle standard “Blackberry Blossom,” along with the bowing pattern Chad plays, which is primarily the “Nashville shuffle,” with a couple variations. 
  • Blackberry Blossom, Part 2 The B part of “Blackberry Blossom” is in the key of E minor, the relative minor of G. Chad breaks the melody down, phrase by phrase, showing you the bowing along with the melody, as well as a short bluesy variation on the B part.
  • “Blackberry Blossom” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Blackberry Blossom” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment. 

    Red-Haired Boy

  • Red-Haired Boy, Part 1 The jam-session favorite “Red-Haired Boy” is in the key of A Mixolydian, which means that the seventh step of the scale is flattened from G# to G. Chad starts by reminding you of the A Mixolydian scale and then plays a basic version of the tune, before breaking it down phrase by phrase. He also shows you the bowing along with the melody.
  • Red-Haired Boy, Part 2 In this video, you’ll learn a more “notey” version of “Red-Haired Boy.” Once you’ve learned this version, you can combine the two versions. 
  • “Red-Haired Boy” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Red-Haired Boy” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment.

    Ookpik Waltz

  • Ookpik Waltz, Part 1 The beautiful “Ookpik Waltz” has become popular in old-time and bluegrass circles. It sounds traditional, but was written by Canadian fiddler Frankie Rodgers. Before teaching the melody to “Ookpik Waltz,” Chad shows you a great warm-up exercise with open strings, designed to help you get even, consistent tone with your bowing arm. Then he plays “Ookpik Waltz” through before starting to break down the A part, phrase by phrase, showing you the bowing as he goes and finishing by playing the whole A part through slowly, so you can play along with him once you’ve got it.
  • Ookpik Waltz, Part 2 In this video, you’ll learn the second part of “Ookpik Waltz,” as well as an ending that comes after you play the final A part. Chad also shows you a nice variation on the B part and how to play the last note of the ending as a harmonic. 

    Soldier’s Joy

  • Soldier’s Joy, Part 1: Basic Melody “Soldier’s Joy” is a must-know fiddle classic. It has a fairly simple basic melody that everyone elaborates on in their own way. In this lesson you’ll learn the most basic melody as well as a few variations. “Soldier’s Joy” is in the key of D, so Chad starts by reminding you of the D scale and arpeggio and then breaks down the basic melody phrase by phrase. He also gives you some bowing tips and advice on string crossings and getting a solid tone on each note.
  • Soldier’s Joy, Part 2: Variations Chad walks you through variations on the A and B parts of “Soldier’s Joy” in this video. He ends by playing the whole thing, basic melody and variations, through with guitarist Scott Nygaard, and also shows you how he’d improvise on the melody of “Soldier’s Joy.”
  • “Soldier’s Joy” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Soldier’s Joy” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment. 

    Star of the County Down

  • Star of the County Down In this lesson, you’ll learn something a little different: the beautiful Irish waltz “Star of the County Down.” It’s not only a fun tune to play but, since it has a fairly simple melody, is a good chance to work on your tone and intonation. Chad plays it through and then breaks it down phrase by phrase, showing you a few variations and embellishments as he goes. Then Chad shows how to play the melody of “Star of the County Down” in the lower octave. You’ll also learn the chords/double stops to  “Star of the County Down” so you can accompany another instrumentalist or singer.
  • “Star of the County Down” Play-Along Track Chad plays “Star of the County Down” a few times with guitarist Scott Nygaard so you can practice playing the melody (in both octaves) and double stops.

    Lost Girl

  • Lost Girl The old-time tune “Lost Girl” is in the key of G and comes from Kentucky fiddler John Salyer. Chad plays it all the way through and then breaks the melody down phrase by phrase. He also talks about how he firms up the wrist of his bowing arm a bit to better fit the rhythm and feel of the tune. You’ll also learn double stops to play on each part of “Lost Girl,” mostly by droning the string that’s lower than the string the melody is played on. 
  • “Lost Girl” Play-Along Track Chad plays “Lost Girl” at slow and medium tempos with guitarist Scott Nygaard so you can play along.

    Fisher’s Hornpipe

  • Fisher’s Hornpipe, Part 1 The traditional fiddle tune “Fisher’s Hornpipe” probably has Celtic origins but it’s played in old-time and bluegrass circles throughout the US. It’s in the key of D, so Chad gets you oriented by playing through the D scale and then, after showing you how the melody outlines the chords, he takes the tune apart phrase by phrase.
  • Fisher’s Hornpipe, Part 2 You’ll learn the B part to “Fisher’s Hornpipe” in this video. Chad plays it through slowly and then takes it apart, phrase by phrase. He also shows you the bowing he likes to use on the B part, which includes a lot of three-note slurs, and a couple of cool slides. 
  • “Fisher’s Hornpipe” Play-Along Track Use this video to practice playing “Fisher’s Hornpipe” at slow and medium tempos with guitar accompaniment. 

Midnight on the Water 

  • Midnight on the Water, Part 1 The beautiful waltz “Midnight on the Water” was written by Luke Thomasson, father of Benny Thomasson, one of the major innovators of Texas-style fiddling. “Midnight on the Water” is played in a cross-tuning, with the G and E strings tuned down to D: DDAD. Chad shows you how to tune to DDAD and then plays “Midnight on the Water” through before breaking it down phrase by phrase. He also shows you how to add a steady pulse with the bow to the melody of the A part. 
  • Midnight on the Water, Part 2 You’ll learn the B part of “Midnight on the Water” in this video. Chad plays it through and then breaks it down, phrase by phrase. You’ll also learn which drone strings and double stops to play and a few variations on the melody of the A part. 
  • “Midnight on the Water” Play-Along Track Chad plays  “Midnight on the Water” a couple of times with guitarist Scott Nygaard so you can play along.

MORE TECHNIQUES

  • Bow Technique: Using Your Thumb In the midst of learning tunes, it’s always good to review your technique and make sure you're addressing any technical deficiencies you may have. In this lesson, Chad gives you some exercises to help you work on your bow technique. He begins by reviewing the proper fiddler’s bow hold as well as an exercise that you’ve learned in a previous lesson. Then he introduces a new exercise that involves moving the thumb and hand in almost a jellyfish-like motion. He also gives you advice on practicing these exercises and reviewing tunes you already know.
  • Bow Direction and String Crossings Chad addresses some questions Peghead Nation students have had about bow direction and string crossings. He uses the tune “Ookpik Waltz” to show how the bow direction at the beginning of each measure is usually a down bow, how to make the downbeats target notes for your bowing, and how to adjust your bowing to play down bows on all the downbeats, no matter what you’re playing between those target notes. Chad also gives advice on string crossings: how to think about bowing from the inside of the strings instead of the outside and keeping your eye on your bow. 
  • Bow Tilt, Patterns, and More Chad answers some student’s questions about tilting the bow, recovering your bow pattern, and more. He demonstrates how he just turns the bow to keep his wrist loose and moving and talks about using a slur to return to a downbow. He also gives advice about staying in position with your left hand and reaching with your fingers to get notes rather than moving out of position.

SWING

   Summertime 

  • Summertime, Part 1: Melody In this lesson, you’ll learn the swing tune “Summertime” and work on learning to improvise. Chad shows you the app/software program iRealPro, which you can get for your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. It provides great practice tracks for hundreds of jazz, swing, country, bluegrass, and pop songs. Then he shows you the melody of “Summertime,” singing it along with the fiddle. 
  • Summertime, Part 2, Improvising Chad shows you how to start improvising on “Summertime” in this lesson. It’s in the key of Em, which uses the G major scale, so Chad starts by reminding you of the G major scale, and then shows you the G major scale starting on the E note. He gives you an example of how he improvises on the melody, without thinking about the chord changes, and then shows you how to improvise just using the E minor pentatonic scale. He also gives you lots of great advice about improvising in general, including using dissonance, singing what you play, playing blue notes, using different scales, etc. With Rhythm Track


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