Instructors: Bill Evans

My 1930 Gibson Granada

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The interesting thing about this instrument is that you get a lot of nice sustain, but then, when you play the next note, the first note is gone, so you don’t get this blending of the notes that can create a muddy sound. Check it out in this video.

by Bill Evans
June 27, 2014

This 1930 Gibson Granada (serial no. 9522-25) was originally built as a four-string tenor. Its current five-string neck was built by Frank Neat (neatbanjos.com). It has a maple resonator and gold-plated hardware. The interesting thing about this instrument is that you get a lot of nice sustain, but then, when you play the next note, the first note is gone, so you don’t get this blending of the notes that can create a muddy sound. 



Category: My Gear

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