THE ADVANCING MANDOLINIST
with Joe K. Walsh

Sponsored By

About This Course

Explore all the modern mandolin techniques, from tremolo, chords and double stops, and soloing and improvisation tips, with plenty of bluegrass, old-time and swing tunes to keep you moving forward.

JOE K. WALSH

Hailed by Nashville’s Music Row magazine for his “lickety-split mandolin work” and by Vintage Guitar magazine as “brilliant,” Portland, Maine-based Joe K. Walsh is emerging as one of the best mandolinists of his generation. 

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Walsh is known for his exceptional tone and taste, and his collaborations with acoustic music luminaries, including legendary fiddler Darol Anger, flatpick guitar hero Scott Nygaard, folk legend Jonathan Edwards, and pop/grass darlings Joy Kills Sorrow, have taken him all over the musical and figurative map. He’s played with everyone from John Scofield to Bela Fleck to Emmylou Harris, and performed everywhere from bluegrass festivals to laundromats to Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium. After a number of years helping bluegrass supergroup the Gibson Brothers rise to the top of the bluegrass world, Joe now splits his time between a group with Grant Gordy and Darol Anger called Mr Sun and a trio with Brittany Haas and Owen Marshall.

An avid mandolin educator, Joe is a mandolin instructor at the Berklee College of Music. He teaches regularly at music camps throughout North America and beyond, and has taught hundreds of students near his home in Portland, Maine. Joe is also co-director of the Berklee American Roots Festival camp in Boston and the Ossipee Valley String Camp in Maine. 

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Watch the video above to get a taste of what you’ll learn in Joe K. Walsh’s Advancing Mandolinist course.

Advancing Mandolinist Sample Lesson

Closed-Position Solos: “I’ll Fly Away” 

Learning to play melodies and solos in closed-positions allows you to play in any key. Learn to play a solo to the gospel classic “I’ll Fly Away” in a closed position in the key of G. With Notation/Tab

Mandolin Lessons

A subscription to The Advancing Mandolinist includes:

  • More than 40 extensive mandolin video lessons
  • New lessons added every month
  • In-depth mandolin instruction with technique lessons for both hands
  • More than 30 complete songs and tunes to play
  • Tablature for all lessons
  • Play-along tracks for many lessons so you can practice what you’re learning
  • High-quality video with multiple camera angles so you can see closeups of both hands in action

Get started now! Use promo code “JoeLand” at checkout and get your first month free or $20 off an annual subscription. Subscribe to The Advancing Mandolinist today and get access to all these mandolin lessons:

MANDOLIN TECHNIQUE In these introductory lessons, you’ll learn three chord shapes you can use to play chords in any key anywhere on the neck; the basics of alternating picking technique, with some great exercises; and two positions for playing arpeggios in every key.

  • Chord Boot Camp You can use the basic major chord shapes in open position to generate any kind of chord anywhere on the neck. In these three lessons you’ll learn how to use three basic chord shapes (open G, open C, and open D) to create major chords as well as minor, dominant seventh, major seventh, and minor seventh chords.
  • Pick Technique Learn the basics of pick technique on the mandolin, including down/up or alternating picking, in which you play downstrokes on the 1, 2, 3, and 4 beats of every measure (of 4/4), and upstrokes on the ands between those beats. One of the trickiest things to get right is the crossing of strings, the motion of the pick as it moves from string to string, so you’ll also learn some simple exercises to practice string crossings.
  • Arpeggios Everywhere Arpeggios are what you get when you play the notes of a chord one at a time. They come in handy when playing all sorts of music, and learning them will help you find your way around the neck, especially in unfamiliar keys. You’ll learn two positions that you can use as templates to give you major or minor arpeggios anywhere on the neck. You’ll also learn to combine the positions to play two-octave arpeggios and how to modify the major arpeggios to create seventh chord arpeggios.

 

BLUEGRASS MANDOLIN TUNES AND SOLOS Learn some great bluegrass tunes and songs that are not only fun to play, and essential to know, but will help you work on mandolin techniques like tremolo, double stops, slides, and blue notes, as well as creating variations on basic melodies. With play-along tracks so you can practice what you’re learning.

  • Kentucky Waltz The melody of Bill Monroe’s popular “Kentucky Waltz” is a great vehicle for working on tremolo and adding double stops to a melody. You’ll learn a few different approaches to tremolo as well as a good way to stay in time while you’re playing tremolo by ending the tremolo right on the downstroke of the next beat.
  • Tennessee Blues The blues is a big part of bluegrass. In this lesson you’ll learn the classic bluegrass blues tune “Tennessee Blues,” which is the first tune Bill Monroe wrote. You’ll also learn a classic slide lick that doubles an open-string note, some variations on the melody, and how to find the “blue notes” in relation to the major scale.
  • Banks of the Ohio David Grisman’s simple version of the traditional song “Banks of the Ohio,” which he recorded on Tone Poems,is a great example of how to enhance a simple melody with tremolo and double stops. You’ll learn the basic melody of “Banks of the Ohio” as well as Grisman’s rendition, including how he combines hammer-ons, double stops, and tremolo to play a single melody note.
  • Chinquapin Hunting The old-time fiddle tune “Chinquapin Hunting” has become quite popular on the bluegrass jam scene in the last few years. In addition to the melody, you’ll learn how to add a backbeat to the steady stream of eighth notes in fiddle tunes and get advice on backing up another musician in a duet setting, with ideas on varying the chord voicings of simple chords, using different rhythmic approaches, and mining the melody for ideas to fill out the accompaniment.
  • Cuckoo’s Nest The fiddle tune “Cuckoo’s Nest” is a good tune for working on triplets, as well as being a jam session favorite. While learning the tune you’ll also learn a great technique for playing eighth-note triplets: picking the first note of the triplet with a downstroke, slurring the second note (with a hammer-on or pull-off), and picking the third note with an upstroke.
  • Lonesome Moonlight Waltz Bill Monroe’s “Lonesome Moonlight Waltz” has a unique chord progression and uses some atypical triplet rhythms in the melody. You’ll learn to play it in closed position with tremolo, as well as how to play triplets with a down-up-down pattern. Joe also talks about targeting the chord tones of each chord when you’re improvising a solo.

 

SOLOING SECRETS These next lessons focus on techniques for soloing, including playing in closed positions, melodic improvising, double stops, and Mixolydian scales, using some classic song melodies.

  • Closed-Position Solos: “I’ll Fly Away” Learning to play melodies and solos in closed-positions allows you to play in any key. You’ll learn to play a solo to the gospel classic “I’ll Fly Away” in a closed position in the key of G. You’ll also learn how to play the melody with double stops, how to move the closed-position melody to any key, and how to find the “blue notes” in closed position.
  • Melodic Improvisation: “Cluck Old Hen” Learn a bluegrassy version of the traditional tune “Cluck Old Hen” as recorded by Alison Krauss and Union StationJoe talks about using “anticipation” to change the phrasing of a tune and about how to improvise melodically by boiling a melody down to its important notes and creating variations that target those notes.
  • Double Stops: “Irene, Goodnight” Double stops are a huge part of bluegrass mandolin vocabulary. Learning them can give you roadmaps for finding things all over the fingerboard. Joe shows you three double-stop shapes you can play for any major chord all over the neck and how to use them to play a solo on the folk standard “Irene, Goodnight.” 
  • Mixolydian Scales and Circle of Fifths Progressions: “Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down Circle of fifths progressions occur in many tunes, including “Salty Dog Blues,” “Sweet Georgia Brown,” and “Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down.” Learn what circle of fifths progressions are and how to negotiate these kinds of progressions. You’ll also learn the Mixolydian scale, which you can play over dominant seven chords, as well as some movable Mixolydian melodic ideas you can use over any dominant seven chord. 

 

MORE FIDDLE TUNES

  • Road to Columbus Bill Monroe’s “Road to Columbus” was recorded by the great bluegrass fiddler Kenny Baker on his album Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe. Joe explains how to pick some of the syncopated lines in the A part and how to play the slides and triplets. The B part has some long held notes, which fiddlers can sustain with their bow. You’ll learn the way Kenny Baker plays the B part and the way Joe has adapted the melody to the mandolin to fill out the long melody notes. 
  • Dry and Dusty Fiddler Brittany Haas recorded a beautiful version of the Texas fiddle tune “Dry and Dusty,” which you’ll learn here, including the vamp intro and her arrangement’s unusual chords. You’ll also learn some of the fiddlistic ornaments Joe adds and some subtle variations using slides.
  • Cheyenne Bill Monroe’s haunting instrumental “Cheyenne” has been recorded by many people. The version you’ll learn here is based on the way Kenny Baker played it on Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe. The A part of “Cheyenne” is in the key of G minor, while the B part is in Bb. You’ll learn some cool double stops you can add to the melody of the B section and which minor scales you should use when playing over the Gm chord in the A part. 
  • Brilliancy Newgrass mandolin star Sam Bush’s roots in Texas fiddling are displayed in his ornate version of the three-part contest fiddle favorite “Brilliancy.” The tune also illustrates how Sam embellishes a fiddle tune, as well as how he shifts positions on the mandolin. You’ll learn Sam’s version in this lesson, the basic melody as well as some of his variations.

 

SWING AND JAZZ

  • Roly Poly Learn how to make a simple melody swing, using the western swing classic “Roly Poly.” You’ll also learn a swing-style solo, a cool intro from the original 1946 Bob Wills recording, some swing chords for backing up another soloist, and ideas on improvising and making melodies (and your rhythm playing) swing.
  • Dark Eyes The minor-key melody “Dark Eyes” is a Gypsy jazz standard, and a great “blowing” tune for working on playing in minor keys. Joe gives you tips on phrasing and syncopating the melody, ideas on what scales to play over the chord progression, and some new chords you can substitute for the basic chords when playing rhythm.
  • “Faded Love” with Double Stops The Bob Wills song “Faded Love” makes a great instrumental tune for mandolin and fiddle. Bobby Hicks’ fiddle version includes some cool double stops and intricate voice leading. It’s a great example of how to use different contrapuntal lines and harmonies to add some harmonic motion to your playing. 
  • Panhandle Rag The Bob Wills Western swing classic “Panhandle Rag” has become a bluegrass jam session favorite. Learn a swingin’ version of “Panhandle Rag,” the melody of which can be interpreted in a number of ways. You’ll learn how to make the melody swing by using syncopation and emphasizing upstrokes and Joe gives you some soloing ideas based on reinterpreting the melody, playing the melody in a higher octave, and using Mixolydian scales to solo over the chords.
  • Daphne Django Reinhardt’s “Daphne” has a simple melody over standard swing-style “rhythm changes” in the keys of D and Eb. You’ll learn the melody and some variations in two octaves as well as some closed voicings for the I–vi–ii–V progression in D and Eb. Joe also talks about soloing in Eb, showing you a closed-position Eb major scale as well as some scale exercises you can use to get more comfortable in Eb and some arpeggio exercises for the chord progressions in both keys. 
  • Swing 42 The Django Reinhardt tune “Swing 42” was recorded by David Grisman and Tony Rice, and besides having a cool melody, is another good vehicle for practicing improvising. The chord progression of “Swing 42” uses repeated I–vi–ii–V progressions in the key of C in the A part and in the key of E in the bridge. Joe talks about soloing over “Swing 42” using closed positions for the bridge in the key of E and using the notes of the E major scale in different ways. He also talks about emulating the phrasing of the melody in your soloing. 

 

CONTEMPORARY MANDOLIN TUNES

  • Two Béla Fleck Tunes: “Up and Around the Bend” and “Down in the Swamp” Learn two Béla Fleck tunes from his classic bluegrass instrumental album Drive: “Up and Around the Bend” and “Down in the Swamp.” These are great tunes to play and also to jam on. Joe also includes his transcription of a live Chris Thile solo to “Up and Around the Bend” recorded in 2000.
  • Darol Anger’s “Key Signator” This jazzy “new acoustic” tune comes from fiddler Darol Anger. The melody has some odd timing, with phrases that start in the middle of the measure and interesting syncopation. Joe shows you where to add tremolo and explains some of the harmonic ideas in the melody. You’ll also learn the chords and rhythm to the tune, including the vamp used as an intro. Joe also talks about improvising on the chord changes of the “blowing” section, which are different than the main melody.
  • Salt Spring Mandolinist John Reischman’s tune “Salt Spring” has become a modern standard, played at jam sessions by many people who think it’s a traditional old-time fiddle tune. You’ll learn the basic tune and a version that imitates a clawhammer banjo, something that John does a lot, filling in basic melodies with strums and chord tones. 
  • Jessamyn’s Reel Chris Thile’s “Jessamyn’s Reel” has become a modern solo mandolin classic and illustrates his style of combining quick arpeggios and melodies with slides and chords. Joe gives you tips on fingering some of the chord voicings and playing the up-the-neck arpeggios in the second part, with suggestions on when to shift positions and when to stay in the same fretting-hand position.
  • Dawg’s Waltz David Grisman’s “Dawg’s Waltz” is a great tune from hisalbum with Jerry Garcia, Garcia/Grisman. You’ll learn the basic tune and some of the different ways Grisman phrased the melody, with some syncopated rhythms, slurred grace notes, tremolo, and hammer-on/pull-off embellishments. Joe also talks about how the chords relate to the melody, and about how he improvises a solo based on the melody. He also gives you some arpeggio exercises in which you play an arpeggio for every chord of the song starting on different notes of the chord. 
  • Scotch and Swing Mike Marshall’s tune “Scotch and Swing,” from his album Gator Strut, is another classic modern mandolin tune from one of the great modern mandolin players. The A section includes a couple of nice “Celtic” ornaments and a melodic reference to Bill Monroe’s tune “Scotland,” while the B part has a number of chromatic lines and some syncopation that gives it a swing sound.
  • Black’s Fork “Black’s Fork” is a three-part tune in A from Matt Flinner, which you can hear on Matt’s album The View from Here. The A part includes some important position shifts while the C section begins with a couple of extra beats and a syncopated strum figure on the E chord.
  • Itzbin Reel John Reischman’s “Itzbin Reel” is another contemporary mandolin classic. John first recorded it in the early ’80s and recently re-recorded it with Chris Thile on harmonymandolin. You’ll learn John’s version of the melody as well as Chris’s harmony. Joe talks a bit about how to start finding harmony parts (starting a third above the melody) and points out some of the interesting rhythmic and harmonic choices Chris made in creating his harmony part.
  • Telluride Contemporary mandolin guru David Grisman recorded the tune “Telluride” on his 20th-anniversary recording DGQ20. You’ll learn the melody, a harmony part (played by fiddler Mark O’Connor), and Grisman’s solo to “Telluride,” which is very illustrative of his soloing style. Joe shows you how Grisman constructs some of his typical lines to fit the chords he’s playing over and explains some of Grisman’s quirky phrasing, in which he ends or begins phrases on unexpected beats. 
  • Where to Now? Learn guitarist Scott Nygaard’s tune “Where to Now?,” both the melody and Mike Marshall’s solo on Scott’s recording. The melody is very syncopated and includes some triplets and other ornaments, so Joe makes sure you get the timing right and shows you the right pick strokes to use for the syncopated lines. He also talks about different approaches to soloing over “Where to Now?” For example, because of the tune’s tempo and feel, you can play all the eighth notes as downstrokes and use alternate picking for double-time 16th-note runs or triplet phrases.
  • Ride the Wild Turkey Darol Anger’s wild fiddle tune “Ride the Wild Turkey” is a contemporary bluegrass instrumental classic. It’s a complex three-part tune (the form is ABCA) with a different number of measures in each part and some particularly unusual timing in the third part. “Ride the Wild Turkey” is almost “through composed,” meaning that there are very few repeated parts, and when there are repeats, usually the shape of the repeated part is similar to the first, but the details are different. 

Advancing Mandolinist Source Material

Check out these tunes and artists featured in the Advancing Mandolinist course.


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